Women Movements That Inspired The Women Empowerment In America

Ever since the beginning to the first half of the 1800’s, women had been ready to move out of their conventional families for making an impactful impression, globally. This was mainly in consideration to finding the opportunities for marking women rights equally weighted in the society.

Such women were not just courageous but equally defined the most respectable positions in the society because of the cause they stood up for. Fighting for the women’s rights, there were numerous women’s organisations that were shaped for this long lasting hard battle for women’s equality and rights.

Female Seminary Movement

One of the foremost movements in this regard was this seminary movement that commenced and took a serious shape by 1815, led by eminent leaders such as- Emma Willard, Catherine E. Beecher, Zilpah P. Grant, Mary Lyon and Joseph Emerson. The intention of this movement was to improve the level of women’s education for transforming women as better citizens of US and be called as the “mothers of future statesmen.” This movement didn’t directly contributed to women’s rights movement but had a significant foundation building part of the game which was a small yet significant drive for equality of women.

Seneca Falls Convention -July 19th and 20th 1848, in Seneca Falls New York

The Seneca Falls Convention emerged as a pretty much influential women’s rights convention. This was the first ever meeting organised by women in public at the United States. The main aim of this convention was to encourage higher number of people towards the subject of women’s rights. In addition, the Declaration of Right and Sentiments took a step forward for the signature drive at this convention.

Women had very minimal rights during the early phase of 1800’s. They weren’t allowed to vote nor have an ownership of a property. Susan Anthony who was born in Massachusetts during the 1820 and later moved to New York at six and attended Deborah Moulson’s Female Seminary- a Quaker boarding school located in Philadelphia at seventeen, was the active building stone for this movement.